- The Foundation For Peripheral Neuropathy - https://www.foundationforpn.org -

Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update

Summary of journal article reviewing the current state of diabetic peripheral neuropathy treatment:

Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient’s goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use.

The complete article is available below.

Treating DPN Pain August 2016 [1]

Source: American Family Physician  Volume 94, Number 3 ◆ August 1, 2016, www.aafp.org/afp